10 Myths About the Stay-at-Home-Mom

Photo by Travis Grossen on Unsplash

If you don’t stay at home with your kids, you probably have your own assumptions about the gig. Some look down on stay-at-home moms while some admire SAHMs. Let’s clear a few things up!

According to Forbes, staying home is popular among millenials for a variety of reasons. The gist of it is that mothers are looking to swap working away from home with work at home opportunities or “pinching pennies.”

In the article, “How Much Does Child Care Cost?”, Care.com states that 32% of families spend over 20% of their annual household income on child care. According to this source, the cost of child care deeply impacts families ranging from parents changing careers to parents not being able to afford it.

I’ve been a Stay-at-Home-Mom now for over 6 years. In that time, I’ve worked very hard at preparing our kids for preschool and maintaining the household. All while needing to defend myself. As if moms already need to be judged any more for the way we raise our families! Popular beliefs or myths are pretty much the only thing separating what others think goes on, and what it’s really like!

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Photo by Hannah Olinger on Unsplash

10 Myths About Stay-at-Home Moms

10. It’s easy

It’s true that SAHMs don’t have to rush to the babysitter to drop their little ones off for work, spend a majority of the day away from their families, and rush home to get dinner started. However, the challenges of keeping a bunch of kiddos entertained all day, cleaning the house while it gets wrecked, and still getting dinner on the table is no easy feat!

9. SAHMs don’t have degrees or a higher education

Even degree-holding moms have to make an important decision. Follow career or press the pause button. Higher education doesn’t always equal higher pay in the career field. Sometimes the logistics of staying home are for personal reasons, and sometimes it’s a matter of cost-effectiveness.

8. No dreams and aspirations

Very much like #9, moms who stay home have long term plans. We know our families won’t always need us in the same way. We look forward to our futures and checkmarking items off of career goals or bucket lists.

7. SAHMs are wealthy

The occupation is manageable with an average family. As long as the one income can meet the needs of the family, staying home is sustainable. In the long run, there are sacrifices of luxury in order to focus solely on the needs of the household. SAHMs budget, budget, budget!

6. SAHMs are lazy

Assumptions are made that SAHMs aren’t busy and that they sit around all day. But truth be told, trying to keep a bunch of kids out of trouble, fed, bathed, entertained, and off to bed is hard, busy work. Isn’t is true for any mom that once you sit down your kids need something?

5. Mom does all the parenting

Some people believe mom does (or should do all the housework) and child care because she’s not making an income (even when dad’s home). In all fairness, moms are built to nurture their families. But moms are built to be a team with dad including sharing chores, handling bills, and both parents being equally involved are all important.

4. Always home

One of the main things SAHMs do is drive their families around. Doctor appointments, errands, to and from school, someone to show up at school events, to and from extra cirriculars like sports, play dates, visiting grandma, the library, birthday parties, etc… similar to the working mom.

3. Don’t contribute financially

The VeryWellFamily.com says stay-at-home moms would be paid 143,000 per year if paid for all of their services. If the budget is still tight after all those savings, Moms have more opportunities to work out of home. Some legit jobs include writing, photography, coding, transcribing, sales, and more. Currently one trend is to sell essential oils or teeth whiteners, all while staying home with the kids.

2. Not stressful

We may be flexible when it comes to time management. However, one of our biggest stressors is budgeting everything well and coming up with alternatives (for projects, activities, and meals). Sometimes a project or trip will have to wait if it can’t fit in the budget. Staying at home can also be tough on a mom’s social and emotional needs.

1. Always love our job

If you can happily do anything while sleep deprived, then go you! But for most parents, we’re tired, our job never ends, and we’re also really good at judging ourselves. Sometimes that gets in the way of enjoying the job.

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Photo by Liana Mikah on Unsplash

Who works harder?

Not all jobs are equal. And not all families are equal.

In the end, we’re all the same. Working moms and Stay-at-Home-Moms face similar challenges. We’re facing issues with our kids listening to us, cleaning up after themselves, and having them finish homework. We’re tired, we’ve repeated ourselves one too many times, and we we all just wish life was a little easier.

Working mom or Stay-at-Home Mom, we love our families more than anything. We’re all really just doing what we deem best. Over all, our families depend on us, whichever path we choose.

 

 

 

8 thoughts on “10 Myths About the Stay-at-Home-Mom

    1. Thank you so much! This was written and intended to break the generalizations. When I first became a SAHM, comments were being made that I basically threw away my degree. I still very much admire working moms and SAHMs alike!

      Liked by 2 people

  1. This is so accurate! I’ve been a working mom and now I’m stay at home, it’s tough work! In all honesty, I feel so guilty when I sit down and actually get to read a book uninterrupted for 10 minutes! There’s always something that needs to be done.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Being a sahm is honestly the hardest thing I’ve ever done. It’s crazy… with a masters degree in the high paying field of education, I was going to be forking over half my paycheck for someone else to raise my kid! Not worth it! Hardest yet most rewarding decision of my life😊

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Daycare did it for me. How could I give over half of my income to let someone else raise my kid? With a masters degree in the high paying field of education🙄 I would have been making less than minimum wage after daycare, but let me tell you, a room full of high schoolers was often easier than my 1 year old!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Thanks for the defense. I think much of the stigma comes from women who really don’t try. You CAN laze around the house and barely feed your kids, but most mothers actively try.

    Like

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